A Daily Thought

Art, Writing, Jokes, Animals, Videos

Just When You Think You Have Seen It All

Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus)

Budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) (Photo credit: David Cook Wildlife Photography (kookr))

I don’t know how he trained these budgies. They are very clever and cute. Our budgie rules the household not the other way around. 🙂 Australian native birds that have been successfully exported and bred all over the world. In the wild they are green and yellow and out west you see flocks of thousands. They are beautiful to watch and very noisy you can hear them coming from a long way away and they look like a huge wave in the sky.

www.youtube.com/v/Pl9PTbtZvMw?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0<

 

From Wikipedia:

The budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) (pron.: /ˈbʌərɨɡɑr/), also known as common pet parakeet or shell parakeet and informally nicknamed the budgie, is a small, long-tailed, seed-eating parrot. Budgerigars are the only species in the Australian genus Melopsittacus, and are found wild throughout the drier parts of Australia where the species has survived harsh inland conditions for the last five million years.[2] Budgerigars are naturally green and yellow with black, scalloped markings on the nape, back, and wings, but have been bred in captivity with colouring in blues, whites, yellows, greys, and even with small crests. Budgerigars are popular pets around the world due to their small size, low cost, and ability to mimic human speech. The origin of the budgerigar’s name is unclear. The species was first recorded in 1805, and today is the most popular pet in the world after the domesticated dog and cat.[3]

The budgerigar is closely related to the lories and the fig parrots.[4][5][6][7] They are one of the parakeet species, a non-taxonomical term that refers to any of a number of small parrots with long, flat and tapered tails. In both captivity and the wild, budgerigars breed opportunistically and in pairs.

 

 

 

Advertisements

2 comments on “Just When You Think You Have Seen It All

  1. cindy knoke
    April 26, 2013

    Love them…..Raised them as a child and bred them. Sweet, pretty birds. Great, informative post. I never saw any when I was in Australia…..I need to go back!

    Like

  2. optimisticgladness
    April 26, 2013

    I SOOOO enjoyed watching this. Really amazing. I want to show my kids this tomorrow morning. Thank you so much for posting. (Smiling really big).

    Like

Would you like to comment? I would love to hear your feedback, if you have the time.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 437 other followers

My Lovely Blogging Community

%d bloggers like this: